Friday, December 23, 2011

THE TRUE MEANING OF CHRISTMAS AND THE NEW YEAR, 2012

We are two days away from celebrating the birth of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, the Son of God. We are also a week away from ushering in the New Year 2012.
The true spirit of Christmas is to celebrate the Greatest Gift of Love which came to us from God in the shape of a tiny infant. This is also the reason why we exchange gifts; we give gifts, just as God gave us the Gift of Love by sending His Son Jesus to earth that we may experience a true relationship with God. We received the gift of grace as Jesus Christ was born in Bethlehem.

During this season, we reflect on the immeasurable facets of our Savior, Jesus Christ; He is our Prince of Peace, Healer, Teacher, the Upholder of Mercy and Kindness, Interpreter of God’s law and the fulfillment of God’s Presence amongst men.
Christmas is actually about more than Jesus’ infancy; it’s about how we can extend Christ’s love and kindness to neighbours, friends and family who are in need. This is the “TRUE” meaning of Christmas!

In the political leadership realm, we need to open the curtains for 2012 as an election year which is going to be quite significant to the future of our nation. With a new constitution, with elections approaching, encompassing a two tier legislative assemblies; with decentralization of resources and political power, with efforts in fighting impunity, corruption and with a focus to ensure free and fair elections, it’s my belief that Kenyans will see 2012 as ‘Year of the Wakeup Call’; to either rise and shine, swim and float, or sink and drown. It’s a wakeup call to either elect leaders who will help build our nation or destroy it. It’s a wakeup call for Kenyan voters to consider character, honesty, values, and the integrity of an individual before they give him/her the mandate through the ballot.
From the smallest position of chairing a tea buying centre to the chairman of a local school board, values and character MUST be considered as the yardstick before an individual or group of individuals are voted to vital positions. The same MUST apply to County Assembly Person, MP’s, Senators, Governors and the Country’s Chief Executive.

Without considering the said leadership tenets, our country will continue sinking in vices of yesteryears. Let us strive forward, and not slide back into the old ways, for these old ways have not helped in uplifting our country’s economical, social, or legislative fronts.

The challenge is on voters to scrutinize candidates who have offered to vie for elective positions. View their vision, their mandates; scrutinize their leadership directives, analyze their true intentions for society, inspect their trustworthiness, examine their reasoning and decision-making, and finally, study their sustainability.....and above all, consider their love, their passion for this land and its people.

With these in mind, I’m convinced that we cannot go wrong but usher into leadership positions men and women who are passionate with the aspirations of all people in the society. Remember, you cannot divorce poor leadership from the myriad challenges facing Kenya and the entire African continent.
Remember, leadership is an action, NOT a position!!

Finally, I will close now with a quotation by Margaret Mead, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."I once again, I wish you all a Wonderful Christmas Season. Be Blessed!!
Joseph Lister Nyaringo
New Jersey, USA

Thursday, December 1, 2011

THE CHIEF JUSTICE MUST BE FIRM OVER AL BASHIR ARREST RULING

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
aspiring MP, Bobasi Constituency
The ugly head of impunity must be crushed right from the head if the executive respected the work, and independence of the judiciary.

This is the surest way to move from past injustices, building a nation which upholds the rule of law, safeguarding a fair and transparent justice system which protects the rights of every individual, irrespective of their status in the society.

The executive is making a huge goof to the people of Kenya, the global community and the people of South Sudan who lost their loved ones because of Mohamed Al Bashir’s despotic regime.

Therefore, the recent high court ruling to arrest the Sudanese leader in the event he steps on the Kenyan soils is good news for justice to victims of the Darfur region and the international community.

Why is the government wasting our taxes to send honourable Wetangula to Khartoum? Secondly, what is so special about Sudan that we cannot get from other Countries?

For President Kibaki, having a soft spot on the Sudanese dictator, we can comfortably conclude that he does not want to see justice for Kenya’s post-election violence victims.

Truly, why does our President want to protect a murderer when 6 fellow Kenyans- Ruto, Uhuru, Sang, Ali, Kosgey and Muthaura are candidates for possible prosecution by the ICC for their purported role in the PEV of 2007/2008, the court which also indicted President Al Bashir?

I believe that in the current world order, despots and their evil regimes must be isolated and treated as suspected criminals at all times. There is nothing Kenya would gain for her citizens from trying to appease President Mohamed Al Bashir.

If anything, our Country has directly suffered due to Elbashir’s evils in South Sudan. And these are the people we share a similar heritage as black Africans.

I want to applause the high court ruling for respecting the Rome Statute; an international law; of which Kenya is signatory.

On the other hand, I want to believe that since we are in a new dispensation, the current Chief Justice Dr. Willy Mutunga, will stay put to protect the current constitution. He should understand that Kenyans are behind him.

Anybody who wants to reverse the gains the country has made, it will be a great travesty to justice and a negation of the successes the current constitution has started to inject though small, into our justice systems and processes.

It’s very clear that Kenya is past the days when the President, was above the law and in the current constitution; each government organ must operate independently and exercise its mandate without intimidation and interference.

It’s nauseating and inhuman when we are trying to fight impunity at home to see our government trying to protect a foreign criminal who masterminded the slaughter of thousands of his own people for no apparent reason. The atrocities caused my Al Bashir’s regime in the Darfur region is fresh in our memories.

Its incumbent upon the current Chief Justice Dr. Willy Mutunga be firm, stand his ground and avoid any manipulation from the executive to reverse the historic ruling by the High court.

The High court followed International law, which Kenya is a signatory and MUST be respected at all times.

www.listernyaringo.org

Monday, November 7, 2011

Kibaki's legacy is dented

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo,
North America
It’s indeed sad that more than 60% of Kenyans are struggling to meet the costs of basic necessities. I’m not an economist but I was alarmed by President Kibaki’s speech in Othaya where he praised his economic legacy which was also echoed by his Finance Minister.

Truly, are the two living in Kenya or they have a different meaning for economic downturn?

Do the two leaders gauge the economic i...ndicators of our nation based on their monthly income or bank accounts and individual investments?

This is a big joke and an insult to the Kenyan parents whose children are currently going to bed on empty stomachs!

Kibaki is a renowned economist but to say the truth, his economic policies have been extremely mean to the poor- more Kenyans live in poverty under his Presidency than his predecessor. That is why I think it will be totally premature to talk about Kibaki’s 10 years legacy when 31 million Kenyans are struggling to put a meal on the table.

Inflation has skyrocketed; the people’s purchasing power is dwindling each day and the power of the shilling keeps plummeting daily. Is this the pumper economic legacy President Kibaki his boasting of after 10 years as Kenya’s CEO?

It’s in Kibaki’s Presidency that we have seen a small class of Kenyans mysteriously rise to riches through unscrupulous (corrupt) means- from middle class income people to multi-billionaires. The same class, including Kibaki himself and several others in former President Moi, and the late Kenyatta’s regimes, accounts for over 40% of the Country’s Gross Domestic product. This is the genesis of the wide disparity between the rich and the poor in the Country.

Though the government talks about economic prosperity like what Kibaki and his finance Minister said last weekend in Othaya, to the average Kenyan, it’s all fiction because the poverty levels in the country remains a paradox. In fact, many Kenyans say, although corruption was rampant during Moi’s regime, people afforded the basic necessities of life like Unga, kerosene, and cooking oil.

It’s worrying to have a government which does not understand the plight of its citizens. In any Country, when citizens cannot afford to feed and clothe, none can boast being comfortable or safe, whether you are a millionaire or a billionaire!

When life is unbearable to your neigbour and you live in material opulence, you MUST feel the pinch inside you if you are humane. This is what Kenyans expected to be a catalyst for our leaders to seek for a quick solution to help the hurting nation.

Not even the ruling class- the President, Cabinet Ministers, Mayors or Provincial administration heads will be safe when you go to Turkana, Mwingi or Kibera and you see young kids gasping because of starving.

We are outraged by the government’s silence on addressing the low purchasing power and the skyrocketing of prices for essential commodities. This outrage will continue increasing even more than what we saw in 2008 from a human rights activist Fredrick Odhiambo who booed down the President during a national celebration. It will soon degenerate to the madness of an entire nation. Outraged people can do anything to drive a point-especially when they are hungry.

Kenyans who gave mandate to the current government will be justified to act in a manner that will prompt the same government to act especially in addressing the urgent economic crisis. They understand that it’s only through governments world over, where citizens’ interests and aspirations are safeguarded.

That is why President and the Prime Minister whom Kenyans gave the mandate in 2007 to manage our national affairs MUST carry out their moral responsibility through commission, and get Kenya out of the current abyss. The two are like fathers in families looked upon to provide solutions to the negative situation in the Country. We will hate to see what is going on degenerate into anarchy or even a revolution which can paralyze the operations of the state.

Here is a distress call from hungry and angry citizens which must be heeded by the grand coalition government partners; the Finance Minister and the central Bank governor to do everything in their power to stabilize the Kenyan currency in order to check the current inflation.

It’s time to talk the talk and walk the walk. The Prime Minister who has been captured by the media in video clips promising the reduction of fuel and Unga prices must remember that Kenyans are watching his words and if it turns out empty, it will be disastrous when the right time comes. The President who appears green on realities over the current inflation and has kept boasting about the economic boom in his presidency MUST open his eyes to see the reality and get Kenya out of the current mess.

Nothing seems to be working-not even the recently signed Bill where the government will control the prices of essential commodities; even zero rating tax on imported maize hasn’t helped anything at all. Political leaders tasked with working out mechanisms to solve the current problems have lost focus and are instead busy strategizing about the Kibaki succession- it’s all about power and not the Kenyan people.

They have failed to remember that the votes they want in 2012 will mostly come from hungry Kenyans who can do anything to make the country ungovernable. All revolutions seen in the world are triggered by the pursuit to overcome a crisis. From the Haitian revolution, French revolution, American Revolution to the match against Ferdinand Marcos and the ongoing Arab Spring; all depict a clear demonstration that people power cannot be taken for granted. People can employ all means to achieve what they want.

We understand all is not rosy world over; including the developed world like the USA, where for the past one week; angry protestors have carried out demonstrations in major cities expressing outrage over unemployment and the poor running of the nation's financial systems which they say is the reason for America’s economic downtrend.
However, the level of commitment from government operatives and legislators in Congress is extremely encouraging. In fact, the US Congress has been working even beyond midnight; trying to get a quick fix to the economic crunch. We expected to see the same from our legislators, the President, his deputy and the prime Minister if they truly cared about the hurting nation.

While I yearn to become MP for Bobasi constituency, there are pertinent national issues which affect all our people across the board and we cannot shy away from it. I understand the resiliency of Ababasi, the larger Gusii and all Kenyans for working hard to put a meal on the table for their families but we must keep a watch on the government because it controls a greater percentage of our lives.

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Al-Shabab Suspect pleads guilty in court

NAIROBI, Kenya, Oct 26 – A man who was arrested with a cache of weapons in Kayole on Tuesday night has admitted in court that he was behind the grenade attack that killed one person and injured several others at Nairobi’s OTC bus stage.
Elgiva Bwire Oliacha alias Mohamed Seif pleaded guilty before a Nairobi Court on Wednesday that he colluded with others to cause grievous harm to Justus Makau Mulwa and Patrick Ndolo Kinyingi.

Bwire also pleaded guilty to the charge of engaging in criminal activity by being a member of the Al Shabaab terror group when he appeared before Chief Magistrate Gilbert Mutembei.

The 28-year-old man who hails from Budalang’i was also charged with being in possession of ammunition without a firearms certificate, a charge which he pleaded guilty to.

Chief Magistrate Gilbert Mutembei directed that the case be brought for mention on Friday following a plea submitted in court by The Anti Terrorism Police Unit (ATPU).

The ATPU asked for the accused be remanded at the Kilimani Police Station, while a further compilation of facts in the case is done.

Bwire was arrested on Tuesday night in a police raid that led to the recovery of 13 grenades among other weapons.

Police had described him as a prime suspect in a series of terrorist attacks in the country, a day after two grenade attacks hit the capital Nairobi leaving one person dead and 30 others with various degrees of injury.

The swoop was carried out at a residential flat in the densely populated estate of Kayole where the Kenyan man was arrested following what Police Commissioner Mathew Iteere described as “credible intelligence reports.”

“This is a major breakthrough in the war against terrorism in the country,” Iteere told journalists, displaying 13 rusty hand grenades, four pistols, two submachine guns and 717 rounds of ammunitions.

“We have also seized literature for war and others on how to make and use explosives. The suspect is in our custody and he is going to assist us get his accomplices,” Iteere had said adding “the suspect is a member of one of the terrorist cells who have committed several terrorist attacks in the country.”

“We are going to drive these people out of town; we will not let a small group disturb the peace of Kenyans.”

The warnings follow fears that Al Shabaab insurgents who have warned of reprisal attacks may hit target areas within the city to protest a military offensive in their lawless country Somalia.

The military offensive in Somalia was launched after high profile kidnappings of four European women seized from Lamu Island and Dadaab refugee camp in Northern Kenya, including that of Frenchwoman Marie Dedieu who died while in captivity in Somalia. Police have blamed the kidnappings on Al Shabaab.

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Clan and Tribal Politics

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo-North America
We all belong to nations, communities (tribes) and clans but these leanings should not dictate the decisions we make in the pursuit of the general good of society.

I promised to provide my perspectives on clan politics when the subject came up in this forum.
Yes, we all belong to a nation called Kenya, originate from some clan, belong to some locality (village) and identify ourselves to an extended family.
All this gives us identity, originality, sense of belonging, and a tradition to rely on especially when trying to explore our lineages.

However, when it comes to the point of making choices on leadership representation, clan, tribe or family lineages should not be the determining yardstick.

Clannism begets favourism, corruption and tribalism, which is a recipe for the entrenchment of negative ethnicity in the national psyche. We fought each other as tribes in 2007/2008 during the PEV. The Hutus and Tusis clobbered each other in 1994 during the Rwanda genocide because of tribal animosity.

We are embroiled in a war with the Al-Shabab terrorist militants in Somalia because of their internal clan related conflicts which dates back to 1969 in the Siad Barre’s military revolution. He failed to nurture strong roots for nationhood which led to his overthrow due to clan rivalry in 1991.

Apparently, the Somali clan problems have spilled unto our doorsteps and our military are risking their lives to protect our territorial integrity.

Ideologically, we cannot divorce tribalism and clannism but we need to remember that, the best tribalist is usually the best believer in clannism and the best tribalist is also likely to be very corrupt.
Since both clannism and tribalism are deep-rooted in many of our Kenyan communities, we need to start taking stock of its negative implications especially on building successful democratic tenets in our society.

Since both clannism and tribalism goes hand in hand, they stifle freedom of choice especially during leadership contests and anchors favourism which destroys meritocracy in public life. In fact, clannism during the electioneering period holds voters hostage; making them support candidates just because they come from their clans and not what they are capable of doing after being elected.

People who don’t mind about clan or tribes are more likely to accommodate other people’s views and ideas; a clear way to mold a better society.

When we will accept candidates especially in democratic contests and discourses based on who they are and what they want to do for the general public, it will be the final nail on clannism and tribalism in Kenya.

We are in the 21st Century and we want to see diversity in the way we elect our leaders. For more than 4 decades, we have seen leaders elected outside their home area and this is an idea we need to continue embracing in order to tackle negative ethnicity.

In post-independence Kenya, Kibaki, Mboya, and Oneko were elected outside their home communities and although majority of the voters were from their tribes, I’m sure they attracted admirers from outside. This is a culture we need to let sink if we truly want to change Kenya by destroying the divisive monster of tribalism.

We want to see diversity of leadership in contests as reflected through the election of Philip Leakey in Langata Nairobi, Basil Criticos in Taveta, Fred Gumo of Westlands, Elizabeth Ongoro of Kasarani and Shakir Shabir of Kisumu town. With this spirit of tolerance which knows no race, tribe or clan and accommodating people based on their ability and contribution to society, we will build a proud nation.
We want a system where you go to any part of the country, sell your ideas contest for political office, lose or win and life goes on. If we let clannism and tribalism get ingrained in our minds, it will dent talents, relegate best leaders, demotivate people, destroy meritocracy, entrench favourism which will culminate to poor service delivery especially in public life.

Rather than looking at clannism for instance when electing an MP, or civic leader, we need to look at how the candidate’s ability will impact on the social-economic development in the community.
It’s not bad to identify ourselves through our tribes or clans, but we really need to start being like Tanzanians who are proud of their nation before everything else.

We are the strongest in the region but behind Tanzania and latest Rwanda, in terms of how we are nurturing democratic leadership concepts and this one has not earned us any respect.

While in a conference in Arusha in 2007 a friend, who is actually an MP from Kigoma North, for the Chadema party, gave us a lecture on the rigours he went through before being elected as MP. He was the youngest candidate as MP in the whole country. Had no name recognition, no riches, and a fresher from college in Germany. He went through hurdles- including clan politics but won the elections because most Tanzanians are not so much into clan or tribal politics. Today, Mr. Nzitto Kabwe is a shining star for the Chadema party in Tanzania’s parliament and shadow Minister for Finance.

If we can slowly eliminate warped prejudices of clannism and tribalism, especially during decision making in leadership contests, we are likely to build a great country where individuals will be voted not on the basis of their tribe but on what the Late Martin Luther King junior called “the contents of their character.”

Letting these negativities lead the way in building political power bases, lobbying for jobs and positions, havens for favourism and access for national opportunities, our Country Kenya will never move even a single stride.

As a candidate for Bobasi parliamentary seat, I know we come from 3 major clans- Bosansa, Bogetaorio and Masige but to me, this is only important for our identity as a people but it will never be the yardstick under which I will define candidacy or seek for your votes.

You will vote for me not because I belong to your clan but because you belief that I have what it takes to pursue developmental programs which will spur the people’s standard of life.

I’m proud of being Omogusii and a Kenyan citizen from the Western part of our country. I’m appealing to you to support me so that together we can face the challenges facing us while united. I have faith that when elected, I will do a good job for our people. God bless you.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

THE GOVT SHOULD ACT ON ECONOMY TO AVERT A NATIONAL CRISIS

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo,
aspiring MP Bobasi in 2012
It’s indeed sad that more than 60% of Kenyans are struggling to meet the costs of basic necessities. I’m not an economist but I was alarmed by President Kibaki’s speech in Othaya where he praised his economic legacy which was also echoed by his Finance Minister. Truly, are the two living in Kenya or they have a different meaning for economic downturn?
Do the two leaders gauge the economic indicators of our nation based on their monthly income or bank accounts and individual investments?
This is a big joke and an insult to the Kenyan parents whose children are currently going to bed on empty stomachs!
Kibaki is a renowned economist but to say the truth, his economic policies have been extremely mean to the poor- more Kenyans live in poverty under his Presidency than his predecessor. That is why I think it will be totally premature to talk about Kibaki’s 10 years legacy when 31 million Kenyans are struggling to put a meal on the table.
Inflation has skyrocketed; the people’s purchasing power is dwindling each day and the power of the shilling keeps plummeting daily. Is this the pumper economic legacy President Kibaki his boasting of after 10 years as Kenya’s CEO?
It’s in Kibaki’s Presidency that we have seen a small class of Kenyans mysteriously rise to riches through unscrupulous (corrupt) means- from middle class income people to multi-billionaires. The same class, including Kibaki himself and several others in former President Moi, and the late Kenyatta’s regimes, accounts for over 40% of the Country’s Gross Domestic product. This is the genesis of the wide disparity between the rich and the poor in the Country.
Though the government talks about economic prosperity like what Kibaki and his finance Minister said last weekend in Othaya, to the average Kenyan, it’s all fiction because the poverty levels in the country remains a paradox. In fact, many Kenyans say, although corruption was rampant during Moi’s regime, people afforded the basic necessities of life like Unga, kerosene, and cooking oil.
It’s worrying to have a government which does not understand the plight of its citizens. In any Country, when citizens cannot afford to feed and clothe, none can boast being comfortable or safe, whether you are a millionaire or a billionaire!

When life is unbearable to your neigbour and you live in material opulence, you MUST feel the pinch inside you if you are humane. This is what Kenyans expected to be a catalyst for our leaders to seek for a quick solution to help the hurting nation.

Not even the ruling class- the President, Cabinet Ministers, Mayors or Provincial administration heads will be safe when you go to Turkana, Mwingi or Kibera and you see young kids gasping because of starving.

We are outraged by the government’s silence on addressing the low purchasing power and the skyrocketing of prices for essential commodities. This outrage will continue increasing even more than what we saw in 2008 from a human rights activist Fredrick Odhiambo who booed down the President during a national celebration. It will soon degenerate to the madness of an entire nation. Outraged people can do anything to drive a point-especially when they are hungry.

Kenyans who gave mandate to the current government will be justified to act in a manner that will prompt the same government to act especially in addressing the urgent economic crisis. They understand that it’s only through governments world over, where citizens’ interests and aspirations are safeguarded.

That is why President and the Prime Minister whom Kenyans gave the mandate in 2007 to manage our national affairs MUST carry out their moral responsibility through commission, and get Kenya out of the current abyss. The two are like fathers in families looked upon to provide solutions to the negative situation in the Country. We will hate to see what is going on degenerate into anarchy or even a revolution which can paralyze the operations of the state.
Here is a distress call from hungry and angry citizens which must be heeded by the grand coalition government partners; the Finance Minister and the central Bank governor to do everything in their power to stabilize the Kenyan currency in order to check the current inflation.

It’s time to talk the talk and walk the walk. The Prime Minister who has been captured by the media in video clips promising the reduction of fuel and Unga prices must remember that Kenyans are watching his words and if it turns out empty, it will be disastrous when the right time comes. The President who appears green on realities over the current inflation and has kept boasting about the economic boom in his presidency MUST open his eyes to see the reality and get Kenya out of the current mess.

Nothing seems to be working-not even the recently signed Bill where the government will control the prices of essential commodities; even zero rating tax on imported maize hasn’t helped anything at all. Political leaders tasked with working out mechanisms to solve the current problems have lost focus and are instead busy strategizing about the Kibaki succession- it’s all about power and not the Kenyan people.

They have failed to remember that the votes they want in 2012 will mostly come from hungry Kenyans who can do anything to make the country ungovernable. All revolutions seen in the world are triggered by the pursuit to overcome a crisis. From the Haitian revolution, French revolution, American Revolution to the match against Ferdinand Marcos and the ongoing Arab Spring; all depict a clear demonstration that people power cannot be taken for granted. People can employ all means to achieve what they want.

We understand all is not rosy world over; including the developed world like the USA, where for the past one week; angry protestors have carried out demonstrations in major cities expressing outrage over unemployment and the poor running of the nation's financial systems which they say is the reason for America’s economic downtrend.
However, the level of commitment from government operatives and legislators in Congress is extremely encouraging. In fact, the US Congress has been working even beyond midnight; trying to get a quick fix to the economic crunch. We expected to see the same from our legislators, the President, his deputy and the prime Minister if they truly cared about the hurting nation.
While I yearn to become MP for Bobasi constituency, there are pertinent national issues which affect all our people across the board and we cannot shy away from it. I understand the resiliency of Ababasi, the larger Gusii and all Kenyans for working hard to put a meal on the table for their families but we must keep a watch on the government because it controls a greater percentage of our lives.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

CHANGE THROUGH ISSUE ORIENTED POLITICS

BY JOSEPH LISTER NYARINGO,
NEXT MP, BOBASI CONSTITUENCY.
My fellow Kenyans from Bobasi and beyond,
I salute you with profound gratitude happiness and love. I wish to share with you the following message centred on our pursuit for servant leadership for Bobasi through hope, tempered on change. Kenyans worked tirelessly to promulgate a new constitution after many years of waiting patiently and hopefully. We all can see and celebrate the short term impact of the new laws and to be honest, there is blight light at the end of the tunnel for our nation.

In the West, political campaigns are dominated by the candidates’ stand on issues like civil liberties, minority rights, healthcare, security, unemployment, the environment and education. These issues shape the debate and give the voters chance to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a candidate. The candidate, who is more articulate and focused, gets the victory while the one who appears weak and whose plans are not in tandem with majority interests, aspirations and believes, suffers defeat.

In Kenya, the 2012 election fever has hit a crescendo in villages, towns and caf├ęs. Voters are debating heavily on t leadership patterns- individuals the nation will vote to power since we are totally in a different dynamic as a result of power devolution under the new constitution which altered the hierarchical pattern of the Country’s political representation. The voters will be voting for the Country’s chief executive, gubernatorial candidates, Senatorial, MPs and County representatives amongst others.

Besides, many voters do reminisce the horror, catastrophies and social evils, which have dominated our Country since independence. A minority will look back and see a milestone because of the gains they have made on individual capacity, but the bottom-line, Kenya, has continued to be drained, derailed, mismanaged with inept, grandiose manveurs for self-enrichment, corruption and violence all mooted by the ruling elite since we attained independence in 1963.

The disparity between the rich and the poor continues to grow wide and wider. Those who cannot afford a loaf of bread forms the easy prey and target by politicians during the campaigns. These politicians love to operate under this negative adage: “make the people poor and you will dominate and control them, empower them and they will question you and take power away from you”

It’s indeed sad that Kenya has continued to produce millionaires all these years when majority of our people live below a dollar a day. I feel ashamed that those we have been electing bottom- up don’t care to develop a contingency plan to address the rampant problems which have continued to bedevil our nation. From poverty, famine, corruption, rampant insecurity, to increased road carnage, and to the suffering of vulnerable groups in the society, all continue to strangle majority of Kenyans on a daily basis. The people Kenyans have continued to entrust with leadership have failed completely.

As we stride towards the 2012 elections, the best gift Kenyans should offer those who have been given the opportunity to serve and lift our nation from the present degradation but failed is a red card during Election Day. They don’t deserve to be re-elected. Even the new entrants MUST be screened so that people knows what they stand for.

Indeed, if one is given a mandate by the people and fails to think about them, fail to empower them, or articulate their issues as an elected representative, there is no reason why that person should be given the mandate to lead again! A good shepherd MUST love his flock, feed them, water them and provide them with a good shelter.


I have decided to go for MP since a believe it will keep me closer to the people of Bobasi; provide me with the opportunity to put into practice the vision I have for the constituency as well articulating my ideas in Parliament to help the larger Kenya. Remember, it’s not easy to wake up one morning and say you want to be this and that, unless there is a burning desire behind it popularly known as PASSION. This passion is not egoistic or for personal glory, but noble, people driven and primarily lifting humanity. This is the MAJOR reason why I want to become MP so that I can put into practice the desires I have for our people in the political discourse.

We cherish our democracy where voters use the ballot to bring to power the men and women with the capacity to work for the robust future. And if they make a mistake to vote wrong people, they live to suffer for 5 years and even beyond.

Having offered myself as candidate for Bobasi constituency, I will continue to appeal to all voters that in me, they have a candidate, who stands for peace, tranquility and harmony. In me, they will always cherish the humbleness and meekness that dominate my character. I mixes freely with all; treating all with dignity, respect and empathy irrespective of their status in life. They will be proud to have an MP who believes in servant leadership through people empowerment. The reason why I think I can do a good job and I will always repeat this before and after election, is because, I will involve voters when running or managing the affairs of Bobasi constituency. It’s a big mistake or illogical to detach yourself from the people whose problems you want to solve and purport to be working for them.

Mine is a deviation from a one man show which is behind the stagnation of social- economic development not only in Bobasi but the entire Country. As believer in transformed leadership, I want to ask the people of Bobasi to bank on me and trust that I will actively participate in the legislative process to ensure that all issues of Bobasi people are addressed in the national assembly (Parliament) without fear or intimidation. I know I’m not a coward but brave and ready to defend the truth no matter how unpopular it will be to existing establishments. After all, my key interest is and will always be the good of Bobasi, Gusii and Kenya. My background on Trade Unionism speaks volumes on my tenacity especially sticking to the truth despite existing challenges from establishments. You can review it on our website: www.listernyaringo.org.

When voters cast their votes wisely, when they vote in leaders who are mindful and interested in public service and positive change for Kenya; chances are, we will see less of the many impediments and challenges facing us today. The negativities we have experienced and continue to experience like: The Hague trials, the post-election violence which characterize every election, the Wagalla massacre, the injustices, the insecurity in our villages and urban centres, the rampant road carnage, the famine that has reduced some of our people to eat herbs like antelopes, the debilitating learning conditions in our schools and the struggles our farmers face in their efforts to increase production and the graft (corruption) and tribalism which has continued to dominate the Presidencies of the late Kenyatta, Moi and currently Kibaki, will all be things of the past.

A general election is a very important occasion for any nation’s calendar. This is the period when the power of the poorest man or women in Kenya is at par with that of millionaires. This is actually the most beautiful thing about democracy, where citizens exercise their rights to vote in a candidate (s), who will define the fate of a nation not only for 5 years in our situation but also the future. That is why Kenya’s success or failure is pegged on the hands of men and women we elect to manage and control the factors of production. We’re bound to suffer if we misuse the ballot to usher wrong leaders into leadership who lack focus, creativity, management skills, and are hell-bent on pursuing the “self” rather than the collective good.

I want to remind all Bobasi voters in this forum to observe keenly from now to Election Day on leaders whose key motive is to rise politically only for fame, riches, to be heard and seen. Secondly, those who make voters an after-thought after being voted in MUST be rejected through the ballot because we have experienced their leadership incapability and inefficiency. Let us not buy their lies, tricks, sweet talk and fiction. More importantly, constituents who understand how monetary enticement from the incumbent and his predecessor has robbed the people of Bobasi off good leaders for almost 3 decades, should act as the best catalysts to change our people’s mindset so that they START getting in love of a candidate’s issues rather than match boxes, shawls, kensalt or cooking fat or money during the campaigns.

I know we have the capacity to advise those we meet in on a daily basis to ignore leaders who use hand-outs to lure them for a vote since such leaders love to see our people in poverty and deprivation so that they can control, manipulate and dominate them. They know that in the 21st century, socially, economically and academically empowered people are very hard to manipulate and that their moribund ideas are not in tandem with the modern dynamics of life.

As we keep focusing on issues which matter for Bobasi and Kenya, before elections, I want to remind you that this Facebook forum has yielded so much fruit. It has enabled us get committed people on the ground currently helping us to build a support network in the existing polling centres of Bobasi. Although the impending boundaries review which will split Bobasi into two remains an impediment especially on committing people to our campaign, we have continued to involve everybody in whichever side of the hail especially those who are willing. We continue to constantly engage over the phone, private emails and virtual meetings. God willing, we will launch our campaign Manifesto end of this year. I promise to update you each step I’m making because this is not about me but for all of us.

Please, I urge each one of us to play a fractional role in our campaign by pointing out what we need to do, how we need to approach our voters, how to remodel our message to make it flow clearly to the voters. This is the surest way to win the elections so that we can start the long journey of changing Bobasi together. I end with this quote by Abraham Lincoln, “the ballot is stronger than the gun.” Yes we can!

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

MPS BEHAVIOUR AT AIRPORT VERY PATHETIC

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
New Jersey, USA

The level of disrespect and open contempt Kenyan Members of Parliament honourables Mbuvi, Waititu, and Kabogo showed to our law enforcement at the airport was unprecedented.

How dare you slap a police inspector when on leaving and entering your compound as honourable MP, it’s the same officer who salutes you, opens and closes the gate for you? Even when you are sleeping with your family, it’s the same officer who ensures your safety and security while protecting your property.

Even if Waititu, Mbuvi or Kabogo belittle our law enforcement; they should respect the crown that comes with it. I laud officers manning the airport for doing an exemplary job without bias. That is what Kenyans having been craving for- service without special treatment or bias! They treated the rogue MPs who wanted to jump the red tape like any ordinary citizen.

Who will respect honourables Kabogo, Mbuvi or Waititu, if they are not ready to respect the law and themselves in the society? A lot of what the legislators exhibited was not because of their love for Deputy Prime Minister Uhuru Kenyatta, but a sycophantic move to score political points geared to the 2012 general elections. They know that the next elections will be titanic and therefore want to use every weapon at their disposal to build a support base.

The Airport is not a place where you go to create a fracas to show political loyalty to your presidential candidate. If Mr. Uhuru Kenyatta was the President of Kenya, would Mbuvi, Waititu and Kabogo would likely have set the airport a blaze!

What they showed at the airport didn’t earn them any marks at all but robbed them of respect and honour. All Kenyans must ensure that those they want to give elective posts must uphold ethical standards and values in the society. They need to undergo a thorough scrutiny, vetting and analysis.

On several occasions, honourable Mbuvi and Waititu have tried to create havoc and breach of peace while at the same time tried to endear themselves as vocal advocates against the inexcusable rise in the cost of living for their poor constituents. We can comfortably conclude that Mbuvi and Waititu are not being genuine with their politicization of the Sinai fire tragedy especially on the government’s plans to relocate the victims. It is sad for leaders to capitalize on national calamities to score political points. Inwardly, they don’t care but outwardly, they shed crocodile tears. What a high level of phoniness and hypocrisy?

We need leaders who are level headed; with clear judgment to analyse situations and do what is right. They must not only respect the laws of the land but also reflect decorum, courtesy and respect to existing governance institutions. Kabogo, Mbuvi and Waititu should be given a red card come the next elections for they do not qualify to be members of parliament representing law abiding citizens.

It’s true, Uhuru Kenyatta, is the deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Kenya and since he is not ordinary citizen, will always attract crowds from admirers wherever he goes but when elected MPs who should show good example goes to our International Airport and want to break security protocols is totally unacceptable and impolite.

The trio’s presence at the airport was sycophantic and did not help anything to soften the criminal charges against their Presidential candidate- Mr. Kenyatta at The Hague. It’s therefore clear that their violent behavior at the airport may end up reinforcing the charges Mr. Kenyatta is facing at The Hague, following the 2007 disputed election.

We all know Uhuru augurs Presidential ambitions but the behavior of the three legislators will reduce his votes. Creating public disturbance, inconvenience and violence is punishable by law and therefore, we are keenly watching to see if the three legislators will be charged in a court of law for what they did in our international airport.

Friday, September 2, 2011

WE WANT TO CATCH A GOOD FISH FOR KENYA

Debating issues without getting angry is a clear demonstration that are all objective in our thinking desire to see a good country with a top- down leadership that is people driven. The joy of a new constitution, the joy of having democratic space where wananchi exercise both freedom of movement and expression is not enough if our people are dying hungry. If our children are not going to school, if ethnic disharmony reigns supreme, if corruption is the order of the day in every segment of our society. If our elected legislators don’t want to pay taxes that make the country move.

According to me and I have said this in several forums; having a new constitution was merely changing the bureaucracy- but this change requires men and women of values as elected representatives. From top down, the new Katiba requires a value driven CEO, Senators, Governors, MPs, County representatives and Mayors. Without a value driven leadership, change in Kenya will be elusive.

When we talk about change, we talk about leaders who understand the plight of the masses. Those stricken by poverty and are living from hand to mouth. The landless suffering as a result of historical injustices or were displaced from their homes in the PEV of 2007/2008 and can’t afford even a graveyard. Those in Turkana and Mandela currently eating herbs like antelopes.

Quite often, in rural Kenya, a young girl is raped; a poor farmer his hit with a machete and robbed at night yet the culprits perambulates lackadaisically in the villages while the victims suffer the agony with no justice pursued. I hope the current Chief Justice who has started on a good footing will check this.
The challenges are many- innocent farmers in Nyamache,-my hometown or Nyacheki who deliver their tea leaves at a buying centre are robbed off their kilos by a corrupt tea clerk who puts the kilos to the next farmer willing to offer a small bribe of Kshs 50 or less.

Imagine corruption in the villages! What must be happening at the top would be gigantic! Remember this is where we have entrusted men and women to manage billions of our taxes.magine, our exchequer has been looted since independence and the culprits walks freely among us when majority of Kenyans are living under a dollar a day. These are the same people who come with the loot during the electioneering period to entice Kenyans with gifts in order to win their votes.

The President, Governor, MP or senator who will take over the Country during the next elections under the new constitution will determine whether we shall float and swim as a nation or sink and drown. That is why we need to be extremely privy with the many theatrics and lies being said out there.
The hurrah and jubilation that accompanied the passage of the new constitution will carry more meaning when Kenyans shall elect leaders who are selfless and ready to do the job for the Country and do it right.

We must be careful not to repeat past mistakes and betrayals from the current leaders. Those who will come the way Kibaki did in 2003, where he vowed to defend and protect the constitution and promised the country a new one after 100 days MUST be ignored. Those whose intention is to perpetuate political cronyism, corruption, betrayal and tribalism the way Kenyatta did and handed it to Moi, which was purely perfected by Kibaki MUST be put in the back banner.

WORD OF CAUTION: If we recycle the current MPs back to parliament whom you have seen the pain they are capable of inflicting to Kenyans, we will be sending our country to the dogs. If we elect a Kibaki, Moi or Kenyatta replica to Statehouse, it will be the most tragic thing for the nation of Kenya. Let us analyse all of them as they come and make informed choices before Election Day.

Friday, June 17, 2011

Lessons from Samuel Wanjiru’s mysterious demise

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
The Olympic hero’s mysterious demise brings to the fore serious questions about the status of our security and our justice system. It also puts a red flag on the way the government treats our heroes and the esteem it accords human life in general.

Here was an athlete who raised the status of our Country in the international scene and many of us not directly related to him are still in shock the way his life ended prematurely.

The late Wanjiru’s mysterious demise didn’t ignite our law enforcement or intelligence unit to pursue concrete and thorough investigations.

There was no government statement especially when it appeared that the investigations were not being done effectively after the tragedy. The police commissioner and the Minister for internal security all remained mute.

The late Wanjiru’s fans, admirers and a section of his family at home and abroad beg for this question: Why did the government treat his mysterious dead so casually?

Can you imagine how Kenya and Africa felt when he raised our flag in Beijing; kissed the ground and made the sign of the cross after winning the medal? And now, he is not with us; gone forever and not to come again. We can’t tell which generation another Wanjiru replica will emerge. Only God knows.

When a Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt visited Kenyan in 2009, he was accorded iconic status by President Mwai Kibaki, and Prime Minister Raila Odinga, but when our own icon dies mysteriously, there is no show of empathy or concern to unravel the truth. This is extremely demoralizing to the athletic fraternity in the Country and a show that we real don’t care about our own heroes who have elevated Kenya in the international scene.

Our nation keeps being dogged by tragedy after tragedy. Criminals continue to terrorize people in towns and villages. Suspects are being lynched in cold blood before the eyes of the police. People die on preventable road accidents when we have the police traffic unit. Women and children are raped, molested or sodomized but we only see highlights in the media but nothing is done to pursue the culprits to bring them to justice.

When problems keeps escalating rather than de-escalating in any society, it reflects that nothing is being done by the responsible parties to curb it or put in place contingency measures.

We have the laws, the law enforcers and the courts in Kenya, but these vital organs are not doing enough to safeguard justice and protect the lives of Kenyans and their properties.

While growing up in 1980s, I used to hear the notion that the prowess of Kenya’s Criminal Investigation Department (CID) was one of the best in the world. I have since disapproved this notion as mere fiction.

In Kenya today, investigations are either conducted inconclusively or unprofessionally or not conducted at all. From the crime scene, handling suspects to court appearances, it does not reflect us as a nation ready to instill proper justice to the populace.

I vehemently disagreed with Justice Emukule’s ruling that allowed a section of the late Wanjiru’s family to proceed with the burial when his mother Ms Hannah Wanjiru had raised pertinent questions following the tragedy. She was right by requesting for thorough investigations to unravel the cause of his son’s dead but the judge threw her argument through the window. I personally concluded that the tragedy may have been well planned and coordinated.

I’m sure justice Emukule would have demanded exactly what Hannah Wanjiru wanted if the late Wanjiru was his son.

The athlete’s mother was not demanding the restoration of her son back to life but know the truth in order to begin the healing process. Nobody should underrate parenthood. I know my wife loves me but my mother’s love is only second to that of God.

A British tycoon whose daughter was killed in 1988 at the Maasai Mara has never given up his quest to know his daughter’s killers.

John Ward has exhausted his financial resources not bring her daughter to life but seek for justice. That is why I strongly empathize with Hanna Wanjiru.

I believe the surest way to gauge the greatness of any nation is how it responds to a calamity whether big or small. In the Western world, where I manage to reside, when a tragedy occurs; big or small, there is a swift move by concerned parties to conduct thorough investigations and also putting in place preventive measures.

I believe Kenya can do better. I believe the government can boost the morale of our police force through better remuneration, equip them with enough tools of work. A strict code of conduct should also be formulated and the law enforcement personnel who violate it should be punished severely or relieved off their duties. We want to have swift response from the law enforcement when you report a crime. We don’t want our police to ask members of the public to fuel their cars when they call for help.

Kenya should forge partnerships with the developed World in this era of global insecurity, to help train our security personnel. The government should approach Britain, USA and Israel in order to tap the skills of the FBI, the Scotland Yard and the Mossad respectively. We have to take advantage of what our friends are doing to better our own systems to better serve our nation.

I believe all is not lost in our country. Whether it is the late Samuel Wanjiru, Dr. Robert Ouko, Solomon Muruli, JM Kariuki, or Oscar Kingara. Life is sacred and those tasked to protect it must do it effectively.

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

THINK LIKE KENYANS

By Job M.Ombati
Author, Kenya the Beloved- New England USA

My dear countrymen,Ladies and Gentlemen.
With due respect to everyone of you,I want to state my sincere opinion regarding the Ocampo six and Kenya in General.It is my believe that every thinking Kenyan,agrees that peace and unity of our country is paramount.It does not matter what tribe or region one was born in.It is not about education,wealth or poverty,it is about us, Kenyans living free,united and able to carry on our daily activities freely and peacefuly.From this perspective, I would like to say the following:

One, Kenya is a country among many in the world and therefore,a signatory to the 'peace' treaty and order in managing her own affairs and safeguarding the safety of her people.
Two,for those who migth have forgotten,this is 21 century.This means,no one is above the law of humanity.No one can kill people and go free.This means, everyone is being watched by God and the international community.

Third,I love Kenya as much as Uhuru, Kibaki, Ruto,Raila or you.I love her so much that I am willing to see a few of my countrymen get 'disciplined' for the sake of our peace and prosperity.Kenya is bigger than both of us.It is definately bigger than Uhuru, or Ruto or the six combined.We must therefore watch that we do not sacrifice the good name of our country and people just for the sake of a few individuals.

Lastly, I believe in justice and the rule of law.The six Kenyans who have gone to the Hague are not criminals but suspects.Let then go,face the law and if found guilty,let them be punished.This will set a precedent that no one is above the law and no one will go unpunished after they have committed crimes against humanity.Those who were thinking of commiting the same crime of abusing and mistreating others,be warned.
So my dear countrymen,going to the Hague is apainful thing for the individuals and their families,but in the long term,it is a good move.This is going to be a good thing not only for Kenya but for the rest of Africa.

For those who have been on Kalonzo's band,let us try to reason alittle bigger and see a bigger picture.Think about our country and not individuals.Think about the country you want your children and grandchildren to inherit.Think like a mature Kenyan and stop this simple political tactics of name calling,insults and tribal alliances.We are all Kenyans.Please Kenyans, think big and wider.Think like a Kenyan.May God bless our country.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

ROTATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR AFRICAN UNION IS A BIG CONCERN

By Mr. Andrew Kerosi
Minneapolis Minnesota

ROTATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR AFRICAN UNION IS A BIG CONCERN
The rotation of African Union Leadership is a big concern and a threat to those countries that are going through political changes and are ready to democratize their political systems as a greatest partner of progress. Yes, democracy is the greatest partner of progress, it entrenches political, social and economic order, which accords mankind a dignified lifestyle.

Now, to have an AU chairman on a rotational format, who is an oppressor and who does not believe in democracy, is obviously a bad ideological mix. Take for example this type of chairman receives reports from the citizens of a member country, accusing their Government of crime against humanity. How is he going to react? The answer is common sense.

What does this tell us? This tells us that, AU was set up for a purpose which has been outlived by its own existence and therefore, needs serious re-structuring or done away with altogether. It is not possible to have a dictator chairing an organization such as AU and expect the application of fair play to the citizens of member countries. AU is not for the well being of the citizens of the member countries, it is a relationship established to protect rogue African Governments. This is evidenced from the way AU has been protecting dictators, such as Robert Mugabe, Gadhafi, and others.

Recently, for example, AU has been fighting alongside with the Kenyan Government and the Ocampo six to defer ICC prosecutions. This is because the dictators have always kept on saying that Western countries with their democracies are out here to destroy Africa and yet these same Africans signed the Rome statute that gave birth to ICC. Unfortunately, this contention is never challenged by some African leaders.

They are always in unison even with those whose aspirations are to democratize their countries. It is a contradiction in terms and tells volumes on how we black people in Africa engage in things we don't fully believe in and results are often not to the standard. Democracy is being stifled left, right, center even in those countries trying to democratize. If some of us believe in democracy, it is important that we cherish and protect it. Look at the recent threat by AU that they want to pull out of ICC. Just because AU support the ICC deferral of the Kenyan Ocampo six cases and the rest of the world is not supportive of that.

In Africa, it would appear, corruption, impunity and all types of injustices are not perceived as threat to humanity, but as avenues the powerful individuals access happiness through doubtful wealth accumulation, at the expense and suffering of the weak. Even inflicting pain to the disadvantaged, the powerful, derive happiness. This happiness is a derivative of evil and is of an unrefined mind. Primitive in its nature and is against civilization.

It is a high time we developed a refined mind, a mind that sees meaning and value in every life, soul and above all, the value of all creation. Kenya is finding its way out of this dark corner, resistance is high but challengeable. Persistence and with an educated population, the lords of impunity will have no place in Kenya.

They will look for friends, north, south, east and west and find none. A new generation of hardworking citizens, innovative and creative are emerging. The Swaggering individuals who have stolen from the public and turned politicians are soon disappearing and the nation will be healed. We are yet to have noble men and women.

Role models and not the contaminated lot. God help Kenya.
The AU has failed and since it was established as a club to protect rogue leaders, it is prudent enough to say that Africa does not need AU, it needs a business club with a strong secretariat to spearhead Africa's business agenda. Some African countries at the moment do not have the political will to champion democracy as a partner of progress and I strongly recommend a hold, on any efforts to resolve Africa's political issues in a collective or in an organized grouping, such as AU.

We have failed miserably!!!. Almost all African leaders have oppressive tendencies and political grouping will only mean to be a protective device for dictators and yet the oppressed, who are tax payers, continue to pay heavily to support an organization which is without political values and is perpetuating impunity which hurts them.

Friday, March 11, 2011

Raila stand out above the rest

Raila stand out above the rest
By Andrew Kerosi
Minnesota USA

This journey of Kenya's constitutional freedom, was started by the late Mzee, Jalamogi Oginga Odinga in the late sixties. In his wisdom he new what he wanted for Kenya and at the same time, he new it was going to be a long, challenging and risky journey. Notwithstanding, the oldman, again in his wisdom, behind the scenes, prepared his son, Hon. Raila Amolo Odinga. This was an extraordinarily preparation which instilled political values into Raila's life.

A father trained individual, Raila is and he understands the art of fair play. He is different from all the leaders we have in Kenya right now, simply, he has been consistent and long serving activist for the freedoms of Kenyans. That does not mean that others are not as good, but his track record is unmatched and unchallenged.

Raila's father foughht two battles of freedoms. The first one was Kenya's freedom from the colonialists' rule and the second one, is the multparty democracy which he started in the late sixties and was achieved in 1991/1992. Remarkable indeed!!! Mzee Odinga, knew the fight was not over yet and positioned his son, Raila to continue with the fight for political space and other freedoms in Kenya.

This is what we have achieved recently, through the promulgation of the new constitution. Power has been given to the people and the imperial Presidency dismantled. This is a fulfillment of Mzee Oginga Odinga's dream come true. He left behind a reliable steward and it is this steward by the name of Raila Odinga who will be trusted with our new constitution. Why?

Raila understands where we have come from and the type of legacy his family, will leave behind. Let us not dim the light that has illuminated and we have been able to see the dark corners of our nation. These dark corners have been hiding places for the lords of impunity and a possible regrouping of the lords of impunity into this corners is envisaged, if we have a weak Presidency at this early stage.

We recognize, Raila's efforts to stand out as a statesman in protecting our new constitution.. His message to the people of Kenya to stand and be counted in protecting our constitution, is a clear indication that Raila would like fair play practiced in Kenya. He is simply the best canditate so far for Presidency.

Let us have this dream come true, successfully and fully realized by having a true custodian at the steering wheel. We want every Kenyan to respect and fear the law. A true fighter and stickler of the law IS Hon. Raila Amolo Odinga. The vision of his father.

Friday, March 4, 2011

PRESIDENT KIBAKI'S DEFERRAL BID TO ICC WILL FAIL

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
New Jersey USA
This is another blatant move by the President to waste taxpayers' money to perpetuate impunity. Mzee Kibaki doesn't real get it.We all fail to understand why he cannot let the law take its on cause at the ICC instead of trying to protect a few at the expense of thousands of Kenyans who lost their lives, property and got displaced during the PEV.If I were him, I will put into good use the tax payers’ money that will be wasted in this futile bureaucratic endeavour. Kibaki "MUST" remember that all Kenyans irrespective of their status in life must be protected by the law through equal justice.Trying to protect the high and mighty- Ruto, Uhuru, Muthaura and Hussein Ali, at the expensive of the vulnerable is a clear show of injustice, opportunism, barbarism, inhuman and ungodly. Watch this space, this move to pursue a deferral in trying the PEV suspects will not yield to anything but damage the reputation of Kenya before the international community. Besides, it will also put President Kibaki’s legacy on the line.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

THE END OF DICTATORSHIP AND CORRUPTION IN LIBYA

THE END OF DICTATORSHIP AND CORRUPTION IN LIBYA
By Robert Nyambane
Currently and in recent weeks we have witnessed unusual political changes taking place in the Arab world, notably in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. The Political violence in these 3 North African Nations, is spreading out rapidly like wild fire across the Northern region of Africa whereby the long time dictators have been thrown out of power by force.

In January this year, the former Tunisian leader, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was ousted. The Tunisia event acted as a hot catalyst that triggered fast political upheavals in Egypt, Libya and other Arab countries like Yemen.

Last month ( February 2011 )The former Egyptian leader, Hosni Mubarak was forced to leave office prematurely by mass anti Government protesters. Mubarak has been President of Egypt for 30 years consecutively. He succeeded Anwar Sadat who was assassinated in 1981.

The next one to go is Libyan dictator, Moammar Gadhafi who has ruled that country with an iron fist for the past 40 years. For Gadhafi, we are just counting days if not hours before we would hear that he has been toppled. People are anxiously awaiting his fall with wide open eyes and sharp ears – watching and listening to TV and radio news day and night just to hear the announcement of a coup in Libya any time. Stay awake and keep your eyes & ears open throughout.

In Tunisia and Egypt the former leaders were thrown out of power as a result of political unrests / civil disobedience or public protests by unarmed civilians. But in Libya it is armed rebels who are fiercely fighting the Gadhafi regime from the Eastern part of the country. Benghazi, the 2nd largest city in Libya is in their hands.

There is great assurance of that dictator being ousted as some of his army units, Police Officers and other personalities royal to him have deserted him and opted to join dissidents in the fight against Gadahafi and his henchmen . In fact, the rebels have already gained control of Eastern Libya and are now advancing towards Tripoli, the capital city. They have vowed to continue fighting to the end.

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There are 2 common factors to be noted in these 3 African leaders of Tunisia, Egypt and Libya; The 1st one is that they were all dictators. The 2nd one is that they have ruled for decades, treating people like their personal property.

The hot political upheavals in these 3 North African Nations is an indication that the Africans have woke up and seen sense in their democratic rights – getting a leader of their choice through general periodic elections. Again, they have realized the disadvantages of being ruled by one leader for a long time. The most significant achievement to those political protests is an end to corrupt regimes.

Similar political changes need to erupt and spread out to the rest of Africa like; East, West, Central and finally land in Southern regions where dictatorship type of rule still exists. Let the 3 countries in the North serve as a warning and an example to others in the rest of Africa.

In Eastern Africa, Yoweri Museveni of Uganda and Omar Basir of North Sudan deserve to resign from power peacefully. Museven came to power in August 1986, and Basir has ruled Sudan for over 30 years. They are soon leaving.

Going to Central Africa, you find another veteran dictator by the name Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe who has been in power since that country became independent in April 1980. It is time that Mugabe should resign and go home.

During the last summit of the African Union, its members states held a convention in which they unanimously agreed and passed a political resolution that no African Nation will be ruled by the same leader for more than ten years in a row.

It is not only Basir, Mugabe and Museveni who should step down, but there are also many others like these three who must quit before fire catches them. In our next edition, we shall release the long list of Presidents in Africa who have occupied office for over 10 years which is against AU’s (former O A U) convention as clearly stipulated in the immediate paragraph above.

From the recent and ongoing violent political events in North Africa, we have seen the evils and dangers that looms when one same leader overstays in power. Even

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in the church we should not have one Pastor preaching in the same church for over 10 years. It becomes dangerous if one Priest is allowed to stay at one Parish for a considerably long period, say 10 years plus. The same case applies to schools where if one Principal heads one same school for too long things will get spoiled and eventually the good reputation she / he had built begins to rot and be useless

Change of leadership is inevitable everywhere – in learning and religious institutions plus social and business organizations.

The current situation in North Africa has been described in similar ways by different commentators : -

> Some say it is war against dictatorship reign in Africa

> others state that it is a period of re-awakening in Africa

> It is to teach the African dictators a life time lesson

> It is the end of corrupt leaders in Africa

> It is the beginning of an end to - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - what ?

All in all, the latest revolutionary movements in that North part of Africa, marks the beginning of an end to authoritarian rule in the entire Africa Continent. This will give Africa a new clean face + shape on the world map.

The ongoing uprisings in Libya broke out in mid February this year of 2011. To be exact it was on 15 – 02 – 2011 when the rebels wedged a serious war against dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Soldiers royal to Gadhafi are resisting the rebels who want to gain entry into the capital Tripoli where the long time dictator is hiding.

Colonel Gadhafi as he calls himself, has defied orders and requests from other world leaders who have been urging him to step down. Soon or later the rebels will penetrate into Tripoli and flush him out by force. This might happen overnight and be the headlines of major Newspapers around the world at large. Civil War !

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

A message to the people of Kenya

By Job Ombati
New England USA
Ladies and Gentlemen.

While I want to thank so many of you for your wise and brave suggestions on Kenya's future, I want to say one thing though. First, I love Kenya as much as you all do. I was born and raised in Kenya, and when I die, I will be buried in Kenya. However, before that time come, I want to say my mind and say it clearly.

First, many Kenyans are tired of Politics. If you are not, then I am. Every time we elect leaders, we always have a tendency to think that they will govern with justice and take our country to a higher level. Many of us have spent time, money and even lost some members of our families in the name of better governance. In 2007,many Kenyans died because they wanted a better country. What did we get in return? You all know.

Secondly, we have been able to listen to voice of reason by tolerating the government leaders we have though we don’t approve many of them. Now, what pains me my dear countrymen is when I see these leaders behaving as criminals and as cowards. We have given these leaders time to govern and heal our country, but when Uhuru speaks as he did this week, it makes me cry. Is this what leadership is all about? Why should Uhuru speak as a little kid who as no sense? I am totally disappointed and at the same time, I am lost.
Someone should tell Uhuru to learn to disagree without calling people names. The way he acted in front of the whole country is childish and he must learn how to disagree without that kind of behavior.

Lastly, I am asking all of you good and learned friends to stand up for our country and not our tribes. Yes, we are all from different tribes, but our house and home is Kenya. So, we must think as such. Stop this simple and silly business of supporting anyone and everyone because he or she comes from your village. This is nonsense. Support serious, capable and brave people to help heal our country. Stand for Kenya and not for Individuals. Individuals come and go but our country remains for ever. Think big my fellow citizens and think of Kenya as one country. Be a statesman and a leader. Be a true patriot and be a genuine Kenyan. Everyone of you should help build the country and not tear it down.
I am tired and disappointed but will not lose hope. I will stand for Kenya. So help me God.
Job Ombati
The author of Kenya The Beloved.

Friday, February 18, 2011

Kibaki taking a wrong path

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
New Jersey USA
The path President Kibaki has taken following Speaker Marende's ruling yesterday does not augur well for the Country's peace. Actually, the body language exhibited by the PNU brigades yesterday was a clear indication that they will coerce him to dismiss the Speaker's ruling on the nominations. From the President himself and his henchmen, I don’t read any passion for serving the Kenyan people- I see tribalism, greed for power, perpetuation of impunity through the retention of the status quo. If Mzee Kibaki campaigned tirelessly for the passage of the current constitution, we expect him to respect it to the letter rather than reneging on the same. There shall be no gray areas like the days of Nyayo. Kenyans fought in 2008 because he Kibaki failed the test of leadership, diplomacy and statesmanship. If he had followed fair play during the electioneering period and after, we would not be experiencing the current level of ethnic disharmony, mistrust and the circus about ICC. I wonder if he is seriously watching the events in the Middle East. Kenya is not exceptional because we’re tired seeing one man wanting to hold a nation of 40 million people under hostage.

The Leader Kenya need

The Leader Kenya need
By Joseph Lister Nyaringo,
New Jersey, USA
Those aspiring to lead a nation of 40 Million "must" be people with a a clean track record. We're tired of the politics of dynasty. We're tired of the politics of big man syndrome. We are tired of " big" names in Kenya's political realm. This time round, we need a "David" to save our nation from the morass of PROPAGANDA SYCOPHANCY, TRIBALISM, GREED, and GRAFT & INEQUALITY.
We want a leader who will narrow the gap between the haves and the don't haves. There is no reason why one family owns almost 35% of the nation's wealth ofcourse acquired illegally when many of our people are living in squalor- hand to mouth. In fact, as I write this piece, people in Turkana, Ukambani and Maasai land are eating herbs like antelopes. Others are living in the cold as IDPs, whose genesis was Kibaki’s clamour to retain the status quo.
Others cannot even afford a graveyard or a garden to plant sukuma wiki. Is this the country we want to bequeath to our children and the children of our children? It sad indeed and this time round, we cannot sit and wait. We are going to rise up in tens, hundreds, thousands and millions to say enough is enough to greed, impunity, sycophancy and tribalism.
The constitution that majority Kenyans passed last year must be respected to the letter. We need to stand up and be counted to defend the stand that the Speaker of the national assembly took yesterday if we truly want to make the constitution meaningful and beneficial to the people of Kenya.
Kenya's Statehouse belongs to any man or woman with values to fight for the Kenyan people and not himself, family or community. I end my opinion here with this Verse in the Holy Bible, Titus 1-7-8: For an overseer, as God's steward, must be above reproach. He must not be arrogant or quick-tempered or a drunkard or violent or greedy for gain, but hospitable, a lover of good, self-controlled, upright, holy, and disciplined.
This the cardinal tenet to better leadership in any society.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

No room for autocrats in the World after the overthrow of Mubarak

By Joseph Lister Nyaringo
New Jersey, USA
The recent overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt should be a wake up call for dictatorial regimes in the world to open freedom doors for their people.
Coming few weeks after the Tunisian dictator Zine El A. Ben Ali was deposed through mass resistance without gun power, it opens a new chapter for the people’s quest for freedom. Bringing down the two dictators was a great show of resiliency and determination from the Tunisian and Egyptian people.
All world tyrants should remember that their days are numbered. They should move helter skelter to embrace freedom and justice to their people. If the Egyptian people can topple a dictator who ruled them with an iron fist for 30 years through peaceful protests in a span of 18 days, nothing will stop the Iranians, Zimbabweans, and North Koreans from realizing the same aspiration.
The Middle East will never be the same again. The wind of change, which first started in Tunisia and then to Egypt has now moved to: Yemen, Jordan, Algeria, and Iran. It’s also likely to spread to other dictatorial regimes in the region like: Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Libya and Syria.
In the home front, our leaders should take a cue from the Middle East events. Nothing will stop Kenyans from rising up to demand for their rights especially when the gap between the rich and the poor keeps getting wide and wider. The rich have continued to a mass wealth when many Kenyans in the Country are eating herbs like antelopes while others are dying with their animals.

The wind of change in the Middle East should catalyse our leadership to liquidate impunity, fight graft and address historical injustices to pave the way for an equitable and just society for al Kenyans. If a bloodless revolution happened in Egypt and Tunisia, the same can happen in Yemen, Zimbabwe, North Korea, Iran or even Kenya.
We may enjoy freedom as a nation but economic disparity will compel us to revolt against the current leadership whose interest is the retention of power, which was the genesis of post election skirmishes of 2008. In fact, if President Kibaki had followed fair play during the electioneering period and after, we would not be experiencing the current level of ethnic disharmony.

On the other hand, if President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe would have said enough was enough and hand over power to Morgan Tsvangirai, Zimbabwe will be in a fair political footing.

I fail to understand why tyrants don’t care about their own future, families and legacy. I also wonder why a person who has enjoyed power, fame, huge emoluments, and respect will wait to be hounded from office and be forced to exile. Does it mean tyrants are only smart in consolidating power rather than pursuing a popular path, which is in tandem with the people’s aspirations? Why can’t they read the public mood?

I’m sure Hosni Mubarak and his closest associates, friends, and family may have seen an impending revolution from the people but ignored it.

From the late Adolf Hitler of Germany, and Benito Mussolini of Italy, dictators always end tragically. In Africa, former Ugandan dictator Idi Amini, and Mobutu Seseko of Zaire fled to exile and it’s so shameful that their remains were never interred in the Countries they once ruled.
Another tragic example is that of the late Slobodan Milosevic who after being indicted for war crimes, died in a prison cell in The Hague, while former Iraq strongman Sadam Hussein was put on the hangman’s noose for committing crimes against his own people.
It’s true Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. If Hosni Mubarak had relinquished power a year a go, he would have suffered less humiliation to save his face. At least the World would have appreciated the fact that despite being a cruel dictator, he held Egypt together; making it the second American ally in the Middle East after Israel.

Good leadership is all about lifting people through sharing their predicaments and aspirations to achieve their destiny. It is rare to find a replica of Nelson Mandela; the epitome of selflessness, reconciliation and forgiveness in the World today.

Mandela may have not been perfect but leading South Africa for one term and voluntarily relinquishing power was phenomenal. Not many leaders will do what he did, even in Western democracies. The question is: shall the World ever produce another Mandela without a trace of dictatorship?

Finally, I do believe that our current leaders have learned a lesson after the overthrow of two dictators in the Middle East in a months’ span. I also believe that they are ready to effectively fight graft, impunity, tribalism and respect constitutional provisions. Time will tell but Kenyan people are very impatient.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

KGU Press Statement February 2011

Following successful Mediation held on February 8th, 2011, between the KGU Interim Committee members and in accordance with the agreed resolutions arrived at therein; the Kenya Global Unity (KGU) elections previously slated for February 25th, 2011 hereby postponed to May 21st, 2011 when KGU AGM shall be held. Details of this important event will be communicated to you soon.

All paid up members are advised to go ahead and declare their interest for office. Potential members are encouraged to register in order to exercise their right to vote and vie for positions in the KGU leadership.

I want to appreciate the following patriots who worked tirelessly to ensure that differences in KGU leadership were resolved amicably: Mr. Patrick Odoyo with his co-chair Mr. Andrew Kerosi, committee members: Wanjiku Marjorie, Omondi Owera, Peter Gachuiri, Jimmy Onkangi, and Abdul Kiptanui.
The KGU interim committee regards the marvelous job that paved the way for reconciliation, unity and confidence between the interim leaders to work together for the benefit of the Kenyan people through KGU. The team reflected strong leadership spirit, patriotism and selflessness.
During the mediation process, both sides agreed on the following resolutions:
1) KGU elections to be held in May 21st 2011 rather than February 21st 2011 as earlier announced by Lister Nyaringo.
2) The suspension of Lister Nyaringo as interim secretary general and Newton Kinity as director to the board were all lifted.
3) All KGU members’ meeting will be held on February 19, 2011.
4) A lawsuit that was earlier on pursued by KGU management committee was dropped.
5) The management Committee will have access to KGU document to do all the work they need.
6) The mediation committee also recommended to the KGU interim leadership to work as a team.

We all look forward to work harmoniously in building KGU and make it as a vehicle for our unity abroad. Brothers and sisters I want to end with this Verse: 2nd Corinthians 5:18-19. Be blessed.
Joseph Lister Nyaringo,
Interim Secretary General
(KGU)

Friday, January 28, 2011

KENYA GLOBAL UNITY (KGU) ELECTIONS ANNOUNCEMENT

KENYA GLOBAL UNITY (KGU) ELECTIONS ANNOUNCEMENT
January 26th 2011
By the powers conferred upon me by the State of New Jersey as the Registered Agent Representing Kenya Global Unity (KGU), and as interim Secretary General, I hereby announce the date of elections when the following positions will be filled:
1)President
2)Deputy President
3)Secretary General
4)Deputy Secretary general
5)Finance secretary
6)Deputy finance secretary
7)Deputy Director to the board
8)Chief whip
9)Deputy Chief whip
10)Spokesperson
11)Deputy spokesperson
12)Three(3)Committee Members
13)Director to the board
14)Steering board comprising: Board Secretary for Governance and Political affairs, Board Secretary for Justice and Human Rights, Board Secretary for Economic Affairs, Board Secretary for policy formulation and project implementation, Board Secretary of Education and ICT, Board Secretary of legal affairs, Board Secretary for International affairs, Board Secretary for gender and social affairs.

The elections shall be held on 25th February 2011 during our annual general meeting (AGM) as per article (6) of our proposed constitution. On this day, KGU members shall officially ratify our proposed constitution. The venue, location, and modalities for the elections shall be announced to you soon.

The period between the date of this notice and the AGM is therefore considered as the campaign period and candidates are encouraged to campaign or hold debates in local and international media.

Potential KGU members in the Diaspora wishing to vie for any of the said positions are encouraged to register by paying their membership fee of $ 10.00, three days prior to the Election Day, in order to publish a final copy of all registered members.

Login in at: www.kenyaglobalunity.com and pay $ 10.00 to become a member in order to exercise your democratic right to vie or vote the leaders of your choice. The “best” future for Kenya and the World is: Power to the People. Indeed the splendor of our diversity is our strength. The time for our global unity is here.

Members of KGU in the Diaspora wishing to vie for any of the said positions should write to me using the official KGU address below and specify the position they are interested in. This must be 14 days prior to elections. I will publish a weekly register of interested candidates.
Joseph Lister Nyaringo,
Registered Legal Agent and Interim Secretary General,
438 East 29th Street, Paterson, NJ 07514
Email: speak4all@gmail.com